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Bulawayo Jazz

Track 5: Skokiaan

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SWP032

Bulawayo Jazz

Zimbabwe 1950, '51, '52, recordings by Hugh Tracey

In no book of the history of jazz will you find any mention, let alone a chapter, about an exciting own style of jazz developed in Africa in the early 1950s – in Bulawayo to be precise, economic heart of then Southern Rhodesia now Zimbabwe and gateway to and from South Africa. This is a grand omission. Here, finally, is the evidence. The dominant figure in the Bulawayo scene was August Musarurwa. Swing your heart out! Total time: 64'53". 20 page booklet. 20 page booklet.

Tracklist: 1. Ndakurakura Mai, by the Cold Storage Band, 2. Mafambiro E Hwai, by the Cold Storage Band, 3. Hamba Hamba Madala, by the Los Angeles Orchestra, 4. Chaminuka’s Magic Jive, by the Chaminuka Band, 5. Skokiaan, by the Cold Storage Band, 6. Ngangile Ntombi Yami, by the Dick Ncube Trio, 7. Ududuzela, by the Cold Storage Band, 8. Ndipe Dza Kwangu, by the Cold Storage Band, 9. Misiwezi, by the Cold Storage Band, 10. ICharlie Jive, by the Los Angeles Orchestra, 11. Ungityel’ Amanga, by the Los Angeles Orchestra, 12. Rhumba, by the Cold Storage Band, 13. Hondo Chivutsi, by the Cold Storage Band, 14. Hlabelani Ke Bafana, by De Dark Brownies, 15. Klara Tsotsi Umba, by the Cold Storage Band, 16. Tsvuku Kunema, by the Cold Storage Band, 17. Siqonda Emaquswini, by the Cold Storage Band, 18. Zuva Rashona, by the Umtali Chipisa Band, 19. Kuenda Namwendo, by the Umtali Chipisa Band, 20. MaChipisa Watere MuChikunda by the Umtali Chipisa Band, 21. Johnny’s Getting Married, by the Chaminuka Band, 22. I May Jump, by the Chaminuka Band, 23. Tipemba Fodya, by the Chaminuka Band.

Muzikifan 2006 (USA): "This is a great discovery and we owe it to Michael Baird for his patience and determination in not only knowing this must exist, but finding it and saving it for posterity. It’s a great cap to the collection of 21 Hugh Tracey CDs released by SWP Records."
The Beat 2006 (USA): "My only disappointment is that these recordings represent the end of the line. The SWP/Hugh Tracey series is now complete, but each one is a treasure trove of African music that is thankfully no longer hidden from our ears."